How to run a 10k

K by K


Never run a 10k before? Not sure how or if you will be able to complete it? Relax, Nike Master Trainer Joslyn Thompson Rule has, and she’s assured us it’s totally achievable. Just make sure you read her expert advice before you arrive at the start line…
How to run 10k, k by k
1km: The first k always feels super exciting but it’s also all about trying to relax and find your pace.
2km: You may still be hustling through the crowds and settling in to your rhythm at this point but just stay focused on your technique.
3km: The crowds should have thinned out by now and you should be feeling calm and have reached a steady pace you can sustain.
4km: As you approach the half way point you can test your pace if you are comfortable. Now is the time to pick it up if you feel you can.
5km: If you’re running ELLE’s 10k, one lap of Victoria Park marks 5k complete! You will now be familiar with the course and can push through. The route is great because there are very few inclines.
6km: Give yourself a pat on the back, high five the person next to you because you are over the half way mark. Just be aware that your body may be tiring out so check your form again.
7km: If at any point you hit a wall and think you cant continue try to stay very much in the moment. Focus on reaching things you can see - trees, benches, whatever – and just keep putting one foot in front of the other.
8km: Things will still be feeling tough at the 8k mark. Make sure your chest is up and your shoulders are back – it will make you look and feel more athletic.
9km: Check your body one final time and ask yourself: are you feeling mentally and physically strong? If so, just go for it. Pick up the pace and go for a sprint finish if you want to. The end is in sight so it’s time to bring it home.
If you don't usually run with water race day is not the time to start (just make sure you are properly hydrated before setting off). Do whatever you have been doing in training, this applies to kit too. Race day is not the time to try out a new sports bra or a new pair of trainers.
Make sure your kit is prepped in advance – you don't want to be faffing around with this at the last minute. The final hours before a race should be as stress free as possible.
Apply this mantra to your travel plans too. Be prepared, know your route, allow plenty of time to get to the race, and have a plan B… just in case.

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