Turns Out Your Favourite Festival Make-Up Is Also Terrible For The Environment

RIP sparkly glamour

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The zeal for glitter make-up has reached fever pitch this year hasn't it?

@pinkishpiendel using some of our Fallen Stars glitter 😍😍✨✨

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Since the flower crown was de-throned, all festival looks have centred around some sort of sparkle, dazzle or gemstone.

You can drink sparkly Prosecco, put it all over your boobs (#glitterthenipple) or shove some along your roots.

Lorde

At this year's Glastonbury, Lorde had glitter on her hands.

We've made it quite obvious @nomadsfestival! Glitter is unisex!😎🦄✨ by @yairaoffringa #nomadicsparkle

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Heck, this guy even put it in his beard.

The whimsical festival look is the perfect way to spruce yourself up three missed showers in the easiest and most inexpensive way.

However, here's a major sparkly effing spanner in the glittery works.

It is terrible for the environment.

Yep, similar to those pesky micro beads that used to be in face scrubs, glitter is a micro-plastic which means it never, ever breaks down.

There are apparently eight million tonnes of glitter being dumped into the ocean every day, which means a rubbish truck of unicorn-inspired plastic every minute.

We might think we look fabulous with these cute flecks of iridescence across our cheek, but the poor little fishes right? They might not fancy it so much.

Thankfully, there are some environmentally friendly options out there, for example Lush stocks plastic-free alternatives.

But we reckon the trend is in its death throes anyway - time to find the next festival look (don't tell Pat McGrath).

The moment you realize💡, that you can transform into a unicorn🦄😍 #unicorndiamond #festivallook #nomadicsparkle

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All things must come to an end kid. RIP glitter.

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