Vetements Has Made The Controversial Move To Abandon Catwalk Shows

The brand's creative director, Demna Gvasalia, says 'They're repetitive and exhausting'

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If any brand was going to rewrite the rule book when it comes to catwalk shows, it was always going to be Vetements.

'We are not going to show in the classical system any more,' said Vetements creative director Demna Gvasalia. 'I got bored. I think it needs to enter a new chapter. Fashion shows are not the best tool. We did the show in the sex club, the restaurant, the church.'

While labels such as Burberry, Michael Kors and Ralph Lauren have adopted the Buy Now See Now approach, where collections become available immediately after a show, few brands have been brave enough to abandon the catwalk format altogether.

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Step forward Vetements, whose fast ascent to the high fashion echelons has been impressive to say the least, making editors and influencers clamour to buy oversized hoodies emblazoned with Justin Bieber's face, £800 jeans with frayed hems and yellow DHL logo T-shirts, sold at £185 each. The brand has decided to scrap catwalk shows entirely, instead showing seasonal collections in their Paris showroom instead.

'We brought forward the season, we showed men's and women's together,' Gvasalia told Vogue. 'It's become repetitive and exhausting. We will do something when there's the time and the need for it. It will be more like a surprise.'

Gvasalia also cited both cost, as well as the nature of how editors and influencers consume shows as reasons for his decision.

'For the first time last season, I was able to watch our own show from a balcony,' said Gvasalia. 'I could see everybody filming it on their screens. I realised that 80 percent of the clothes we did were not really seen or understood. And it cost so much. You cannot put on a show for less than 25,000 euros. That one cost in the region of 100,000 euros, with the venue. And there are brands now putting on shows around the world which cost millions. I think it's a complete waste.'

As with so much that Vetements does, the industry will doubtlessly take note.

From: Harpers Bazaar UK
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