You'll Get Chills After Hearing This Teenager Explain #BlackLivesMatter

An American student has delivered a chilling speech about police violence and racial inequality and has left us speechless


In recent months, the phrase 'black lives matter' has become a rallying cry throughout society in response to the on-going racial violence at the hands of members of the police in the US.

Following the fatal shootings of Terence Crutcher in Oklahoma and Keith Lamont Scott in North Carolina earlier this month, protests have broken out across the country.

Anger is brewing at an ever increasing rate, every time another person's civil rights are seen to be ignored.


However, while the phrase was originally intended to draw attention to police brutality and racial discrimination targeted at the black community, it has led to much confusion among critics who wrongfully suggest the phrase's emphasis on the importance of black lives somehow means other races don't matter.


But, a video posted to Twitter yesterday is now going viral as a result of one student's emotional speech explaining the meaning of the #BlackLivesMatter movement, segregation and how racist violence affects the treatment of the black community.

The video - which has been shared over 26,000 times – sees the visibly upset teenager clarifying how the phrase doesn't question whether other lives matter, but asks whether the lives of black people are valued on a similar level to any other life out there, as the way policemen are treating black people in the US suggests they aren't.

'The people who are supposed to protect [us] are killing [us] every day,' she opens.

I'm not saying that police officers are bad. I'm not saying I'm anti-cop. Because that's not what it means. What it means is that black lives matter too. But people seem to forget that the 'too' is on there.

'We're not saying white lives don't matter, or police lives don't matter, or Hispanic lives don't matter or Middle Eastern lives don't matter. We are saying that there's problem in this country with people caring for black people since the beginning of time,' she adds.


The eloquent teen goes onto explain her own family's experience of racial injustice, telling her classmates that her grandparents were once forced to pick cotton and how her mother endured racial abuse during the Seventies.

'You keep thinking that we're going to sit here and let this keep happening to us,' she continues.

People ask me why I want to be a lawyer – this is why. You cannot allow this to happen. You cannot value someone else's life in society over someone else's.

'If you can't see that it's a problem then you're oblivious to it,' she concludes.

Profound words.

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