Here Are the 21 Books We're Most Excited to Read in 2018

Pile 'em up.

Zadie Smith, Meg Wolitzer, Sloane Crosley: 2018's notable books read like a who's who of the bookshelf. Whether you're thrilled to encounter these favorites again or be enthralled by a totally new literary love, the best way to get into gear is with this guide to the books that will most excite and excel.

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Brass by Xhenet Aliu (January 23)

This debut novel about immigrants drawn to a Connecticut brass town is garnering buzz. Four generations on, a teenager faces a future in the town that's gripped her family for years, and searches the past for clues about how to change her fate.

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This Will Be My Undoing by Morgan Jerkins (January 30)

Start your year off with this collection of essays by Morgan Jerkins focused on "living at the intersection of black, female, and feminist in (white) America." Jerkins tackles topics from Rachel Dolezal to Sailor Moon and black female sexuality.

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The Wedding Date by Jasmine Guillory (January 30)

I need to read this rom-com immediately. The meet-cute? A guy gets stuck in an elevator with a woman (naturally) and asks her to come to a wedding as his date (amazing). Also, he's a pediatric surgeon and she's a mayor's chief of staff. Do you need more details? Didn't think so.

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Feel Free by Zadie Smith (February 6)

New writing by Zadie Smith is always a cause for celebration. In this collection of essays, she considers what it means to be a global, literary, and digital citizen, with her typical unassuming candor and seemingly casual brilliance.

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An American Marriage by Tayari Jones (February 6)

Tayari Jones explores the human impact of ugly injustices in her fourth novel. Celestial and Roy, a married couple ostensibly facing a bright future, are cruelly sundered when he is sentenced to a long jail sentence for a crime he didn't commit.

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All the Names They Used for God by Anjali Sachdeva (February 20)

Ever feel completely beholden to forces greater than your will? Such is the common lot of Anjali Sachdeva's protagonists and, I suspect, many of us on any given day. This debut collection of stories delves into no smaller subjects than power, science, loss, and love.

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The Merry Spinster by Mallory Ortberg (March 13)

Feminist fairy tales? Just what the doctor ordered. Texts From Jane Eyre and Dear Prudence agony aunt Mallory Ortberg conjures up the kinds of stories that will hopefully scary the bogeymen—with the emphasis on "men"—away.

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The Emissary by Yoko Tawada (March 19)

In a kind of Benjamin Button take on Japan's demographic predicament, an aging population, Yoko Tawada's short forthcoming novel imagines a post-disaster world in which children are born wizened and wise, so it's the elderly who must carry the day.

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The Female Persuasion by Meg Wolitzer (April 3)

Meg Wolitzer could be considered a grande dame of the literary world, but at the center of her new novel is Greer Kadetsky, a college student just beginning to formulate the shape of her future. When Greer meets the established figure Faith Frank, that vision becomes just that much sharper.

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The List by Amy Siskind (April 3)

The new year is a great time to regroup; fuel your productive energies with this account of Trump's first year in office. Amy Siskind has been compiling the presidents misdeeds in The Weekly List, and here it is, all together in one book.

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From: Elle
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