We Should All Eat Crumble And 4 More Health Tips For The Week

Plus, your millionth reason to eat avocado


1. Runner’s high is a real thing and is better than drugs

Smug runners often talk about runners high as they skip past you post-workout. If running is your worse nightmare, you might want to reconsider it as it turns out they are onto something good. A new study by Oxford University has found that the chemical compounds produced in the body of someone running are the same as those found in cannabis. Working alongside the endorphins produced to help you keep going on the run, these chemicals hit the pleasure receptors in the brain to make you feel good. 


2. Britain is health-food mad

It’s not surprising considering the rise of healthy bloggers and recipe books, but Waitrose have published the proof that the UK is officially on a health kick. The annual report shows that sales of avocados have boomed by 24% in 2015 and almond milk has taken over soya milk as the leading dairy-free milk alternative. Sales of white sugar have also dropped this year.  

3. Mediterranean food is best for your brain

New research from Columbia University in New York has found that eating a Mediterranean diet rich in oily fish, nuts, vegetables, fruit and olive oil can slow down signs of aging to your brain. According to the study, our brains are an average size of 1,400 millimeters, but gradually shrink as we age, however those who ate a balanced Mediterranean diet were found to have a brain volume that was 13.11 millimeters larger – or five years less aging. More avocado toast for us.

4. We should all be eating rhubarb crumble

It might sound too good to be true, but new research by scientists at Atlanta's Emory University have found that in addition to its high content of antioxidants like lycopene and vitamin K, rhubarb also contains an orange-coloured compound called parietin that breaks down leukaemia cells. The tests found it took 48 hours for the parietin to break down the cells. Crumble and custard it is!

5. Anxiety in young people is on the rise

This week the Office for National Statistic released a report on the mental health and well-being of young people. 7.5million people aged between 16-24 were surveyed and the findings revealed 18% reported high levels of anxiety and 16% have ‘medium’ levels. This news coincides with the first Mindful National UK report to be published which calls for more resources focused towards good mental health in areas of education and workplaces.

Words: Annie Rice

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