What Even Is Black Friday?

Sharpen your elbows!


For the bargain-hungry, style-savvy, endurance shoppers out there, forget Boxing Day sales - so 2013 darling - the hottest new consumer carnival is Black Friday.

Much like Halloween, cheeseburgers and pumpkin spice lattes, Black Friday is another American export that has an inexplicable hold over us.


It's difficult to pinpoint exactly when us Brits began grappling for bargain TV's, designer fragrances and clothes that don't really fit us, but it's been a thing in America since the 50s, where, after gorging on Turkey, gravy and pumpkin pie, our transatlantic cousins traditionally breakdown the barriers and raid their local stores the day after Thanksgiving, a Friday.

Although you may think that the ominous 'Black' prefix represents the colour the sky turns as baying mobs devour the deals on offer, it's actual origin is a point of contention. Two popular theories are that it's either named as such due to the profits raised on the day, moving retailers from the red to the black, or that it's a term coined by stores because so many staff would call in ill the day after Thanksgiving, making it a bleak day to deal with shoppers.


Unfortunately we haven't adopted Thanksgiving yet, which is essentially a second Christmas dinner on a Thursday, but we have truly embraced Black Friday. It's estimated that we will spend more than £1.9 billion online and in store this year, which works out at £21,990 every second, which equates to a lot of enthusiastic spending.

If you can't make Black Friday, then there's always Cyber Monday, which is pretty much the same as Black Friday, but it's on a Monday and dedicated to online deals.

So sharpen those elbows and brace yourself for some online or highstreet bargains, just don't get into any fights over that must-have piece.

Unless you really, really must have it.



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