Put Down The Colourful Bagel, We've Reached Peak Rainbow

Step away from the food dye folks, the rainbow has to die

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It all started with the rainbow cake. 

Actually, we're retracting that statement. It all started in the 90s with My Little Pony and Troll dolls and cutesy pencil rubbers and transfer tattoos.

And then with the advent of the noughties and tensies (or whatever we're calling them), we suddenly transferred our rainbow obsession to food and developed the rainbow doughnut, rainbow cake-pops (combining the rainbow fetish with our love of all things miniature), rainbow cheese toasties and even the rainbow cronut, which is the ultmiate hybrid.

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But really, haven't we reached peak rainbow now?

Apart from the fact that consuming that much food dye can't be good for our intestines, we should probably stop and dissect what it is about rainbows that makes us crave rainbow coloured things like mad, neon-hungry fiends. 

Perhaps it's that the rainbow is imbued with a sense of optimism and promise. Much like leprechauns, we're hoping that they'll lead to good fortune. 

ELLE's Deputy Editor Lotte Jeffs is concerned for the future of the rainbow, as an important icon of homosexuality. Are the masses co-opting the rainbow to the point where it won't have the same LGBT significance anymore?

Are we just obsessed with making things strikingly visual for social media, to the detriment of our own nutritional health?

Whatever the reason for the rainbow renaissance, we're of the general opinion in the office that it needs to stop.

🌈👀🌈 #rainboweyes #makeup #makeupbyme #denizyilmaz 💛

A photo posted by Ayse Kaymakoglu (@aysekaymakoglu) on

Rainbow patches and rainbow eyeliners are infantilising and turning food artificially mutlicoloured doesn't sit well with our other passions for clean eating and taking meal preparation back to basics.

Think us mean-spirited? Tell us why you disagree on Twitter @ELLEUK!

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