Sweden Is Organising Its First Female-Only Music Festival

It comes after reports of sexual assaults at other festivals

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Sweden is to hold its first ever female-only music festival following reports of sexual assaults at other festivals across the country.

Swedish's largest festival Bråvalla was recently cancelled for 2018 after reports of four rapes and 23 sexual assaults that allegedly took place on the site (via The Guardian).

Bråvalla took place last week on June 28 to July 1, and featured acts including The Killers, System of a Down, and The Chainsmokers.

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One woman said she was forced to have sex with a man after changing her mind. The organisers of the festival went on to confirm: "Certain men … apparently cannot behave. It's a shame.

'We have therefore decided to cancel Bråvalla 2018.'

In response to the outcry over numerous assaults, Swedish comedian and radio presenter Emma Knyckare Tweeted out the suggestion of a man-free rock music festival, posting: 'What do you think about putting together a really cool festival where only non-men are welcome, that we'll run until ALL men have learned how to behave themselves?'

Her suggestion picked up so much traction that Sweden's first-ever man-free festival will be taking place next summer, in the place of Bråvalla.

After receiving a wave of support from fans and followers, Knyckare has since confirmed on Instagram: 'Sweden's first man-free rock festival will see the light next summer.

'In the coming days I'll bring together a solid group of talented organisers and project leaders to form the festival organisers, then you'll hear from everyone again when it's time to move forward.'

This isn't the first time the country has been plagued with incidences of sexual assault.

Stockholm's We Are STHLM was also bombarded with allegations of sexual attacks and harassment in 2014 and 2015, which prompted British festivals to stage an online black out as part of the Association of Independent Festival's campaign to raise awareness around sexual safety at festivals.

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